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Italo Modern 2

This recently published book revisits hidden jewels of Italian Modernism

by Adam Stech
on 07 December 2015

The second half of last century was a golden age for Italian architecture, with many experimental buildings constructed in big cities, tiny towns and remote areas. These almost forgotten architectural masterpieces are explored with tenderness in "Italo Modern 2."

Published by Swiss Park Books, the book is the brainchild of two architects (and brothers) from Vienna: Martin and Werner Feiersinger. To compile the tome, the duo traveled throughout northern Italy to photograph numerous monuments built during the rationalist, organic and brutalist architecture movements. Together, they visited both well-known wonders and hidden gems—all built between 1946 and 1976—and made sure to document them in their true state, depicting their natural surroundings and all signs of aging.

As the name suggests, "Italo Modern 2" is the second volume of an architectural guide. Identical in form and charming minimalist design as its predecessor, the new book presents even more pages and mapped buildings. Over 132 unique structures fill the tome, chronicled through detailed summaries, architect biographies and exact addresses—so you can even visit them in the flesh.

Readers will discover (potentially) unknown early works of Ettore Sottsass, dating back to the 1950s, and creations by Cortina d'Ampezzo-based architect Edoardo Gellner. His extensive development of mountain Modernist architecture during the 1950s shows how modern architecture can sensitively complete the forested slopes of the Italian Alps. This thoughtful approach to nature and architecture is echoed in Mario Galvagni's work, whose bizarre 1950s organic style—which he applied in the seaside resort of Torre del Mare in Liguria—is heavily inspired by nature.

"Italo Modern 2" (designed by Willi Shmid with Agipo typeface by Czech designer Radim Peško) is covered in purple suede and is available for purchase for €40.

Images by Adam Stech

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