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Westcomb Focus LT Hoody
The first bare bones shell jacket constructed of 100% waterproof and air permeable eVent DVL fabric
by Graham Hiemstra
on 14 January 2013
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Whether you spend your spare time in the great outdoors or exploring the city, a lightweight, waterproof jacket is a staple this time of year. A standout among the masses of Gore-Tex and Thinsulate out there is the Focus LT Hoody from Westcomb, a company known for melding sleek design with the latest in high-performance materials. Dubbed a hoody due to its basic build—no pit zips or interior media pockets—this bare bones shell jacket is the first by any brand to be constructed entirely of eVent DVL, a 100% waterproof and air permeable material for extremely effective protection and ventilation. Like all Westcomb products, it's designed and manufactured in British Columbia.

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Last spring we got to know the Switch LT Hoody, a similar piece of performance outerwear that at that point was considered the lightest Polartec NeoShell jacket on the market at 14.5 ounces. Now we see the Focus LT Hoody weigh in at an impressive 8.93 ounces. The change in fabric and function—the LT is ideal for ultralight activities or as a backpacking backup—makes for a deconstructed shell that not only weighs less but also features a fuller fit, with a longer body for added coverage. Additionally, the rear elastic seam is finished with an internal rubber strip to keep the jacket from riding up during activities like running or cycling.

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To minimize weight every detail has been considered, from fusing seams to reduce the use of heavy thread to removing all hang tags and labels. Of the range of colors, we're really digging the "Flame" shade, which seems to dance back and forth from red to orange in different light. The Focus LT Hoody can now be found online from Westcomb for $280 and in shops in early February 2013.

Images by Greg Stefano

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