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Foodzines: Around the World

A global selection of publications exploring food through innovative creative direction and photography

by CH Contributor in Food + Drink on 27 May 2013

by Laila Gohar

All over the world, from Tokyo to Beirut, a handful of compelling food journals are being published. Here we bring you a filtered selection of foodzines that have an international perspective and offer a peek into a unique food culture. Whether you're intrigued by the relationship between food and art in Harajuku, the debate on #foodporn versus #foodmourn, or exploring the tradition of using carrot as a sweetener, there’s something to satisfy every palate.

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Cereal, UK

Bristol-based food and travel quarterly, Cereal Magazine is aimed at our inner child. “Back when we were little, we learned many fun facts from the back of cereal boxes. These boxes were the first thing we read each day, and they taught and entertained us,” says editor Rosa Park. Each issue is structured like a book with chapters containing detailed expositions of edible topics and travel destinations. Each issue also profiles innovators within the food industry, from every corner of the world. The journal’s sleek, minimal and unpretentious aesthetic, combined with well-vetted content, makes for the perfect morning read.

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Rocket, Japan

If Julia Child and Salvador Dalí had a love child who was born in Harajuku, Rocket Magazine would be their guiding light. The Japanese publication—which is structured like a newspaper—explores the overlap of food and art in urban settings. Each page contains images that appear to be haphazardly placed, yet somehow create a beautiful, perfectly calculated mess. Rocket is currently only published in Japanese, with tidbits of English text appearing on its pages. Still, anyone can enjoy this zine for its vidid pictures of Japan's most eye-catching eats.

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Fricote, France

Founded by the creators of Shoes-Up, a footwear-focused magazine with a cult following, Fricote is a bilingual French/English culinary culture and lifestyle publication that caters to epicureans. Past issues of the quarterly have included Colonel Sanders’ famed secret recipe and interviews with electrofunk duo Chromeo. Staying true to its Parisian roots, the magazine also gave readers the dish on Philippe Starck’s latest venture, a 250-seat cafeteria-style restaurant in Paris’ St. Ouen flea market. Fricote is a mélange of playful illustrations, serious food journalism and stunning photography.

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The Carton, Beirut

The Carton is an intriguing quarterly magazine published in Dubai and printed in Beirut. Each issue surveys different aspects of food culture in the Middle East, while emphasizing both the region’s rich traditional food and its bourgeoning avant-garde food scene. When looking to name the publication, founder Jade George wanted something food-related, accessible and part of everyday lexicon could be easily translated into French, Arabic and English (the three most widely spoken languages in Lebanon). The result: The Carton, Al Cartoona, and Le Carton—three words in English, Arabic and French, respectively, that sound almost identical. As simple as a carton of milk or eggs.

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Fool, Sweden

Former art director of Swedish Gourmet Magazine, Lotta Jörgensen, teamed up with her food photographer husband to bring the food world something different with Fool. “Gastronomy needs to be taken seriously, but with humor," says Jörgensen. Collaborating with photographers and illustrators gives the publication a unique art direction—similar to that of a design or fashion magazine. "There are no recipes; no high-end fashion magazine would have sewing patterns for clothes," says Jörgensen. The Swedish publication is restrained but also provocative; a blend not usually associated with food magazines. For example; the first issue, which featured chef Magnus Nilsson on the cover in a Iron Maiden T-shirt and a heavy fur coat leaning against a striking black backdrop. Fool’s tagline probably describes the magazine best: food, insanity, brilliance and love.

Images courtesy of the respective publications

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