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Six Bike Baskets

by Brian Fichtner in Design on 21 March 2008

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If you've ever walked through Manhattan's Union Square green market early in the morning, you might have noticed the jury-rigged bicycles chefs use to transport their produce purchases. Cycling city streets with a cargo platform, though, is not a task to be taken lightly. With spring just around the corner and nature's bounty soon spilling into markets nationwide, we thought a timely round-up of handy bicycle baskets most appropriate.

Top on the list is the Basil Blossom Basket (right). A throwback design that uses recyclable fiber in place of traditional wicker, the $37 basket features steel construction, carrying straps, and suspension hooks for a handlebar or rear-rack mount. It's available from Velo Orange.

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For artisan enthusiasts, the Hershberger Baker's Basket (above left), at $65, will satisfy on many fronts. Made by an Amish family in rural Minnesota, the large basket is based on those used by old European bakers. Because of its size, it's recommended that one pair this with a front rack.

Reisenthel has been making inroads here in the U.S. through sites like Reusable Bags. All of their market baskets are comprised of a fold-down lightweight aluminum frame and a polyester covering. Sadly, their smart handlebar mount bag (above right) isn't available stateside. Nevertheless, you can purchase through the company's online shop for €60.

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We couldn't help but include the lacy plastic Carrie (left) by Marie-Louise Gustafsson for Design House Stockholm. It may be a bit decorative, but the rugged material and carrying strap meld form and function, making it a no-brainer for market use. It's available in black, white or green for $55 at Scandinavian Grace or in green only for $60 at MoMA.

Finally, for those who find a front load basket too cutesy, and prefer a no bones about it style, there are a handful of simple wire baskets produced by the Kentucky-based company Wald. Oh, and if you need heritage, they've been in business for a hundred years. Rivendell Bicycle Works has a nice model (below right) for $20. Lash it to a rear rack and be sure to use a net, or you'll be losing that wild arugula on your way home.

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Also, in the less-is-more category, the Swedish Lift-off Bicycle Basket (above left) hooks over handlebars and features a handle, making it easily adaptable for use in the market as well. The vinyl coated metal will protect it from weather and the cost is a reasonable $40. It's available online from Kiosk.

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