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Bike Gear for Rainy Days

Three products to help riders stay cycling—even when the weather turns

by Adrienne So
on 24 September 2014

The old Swedish saying goes that there’s no bad weather, just bad clothes—but the dampness and chill of a Pacific Northwestern autumn can make many a devoted cyclist hang their bike up in the garage until spring. That said, a few carefully chosen items can extend your cycling season for quite a while longer. While we don't have all the answers, the following three items are sure to make battling the elements a bit more comfortable.

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Musguard Rolling Bike Fender

As we've seen in the Plume mudguard, a clever solution to bulky bolt-on fenders exist. And, thanks to yet another successful Kickstarter, Musguard ($29) shows the desire for stylish, fast, packable bike fenders is thriving. Unlike the Plume, the Musguard attaches to the seat post with Velcro—eliminating the need to remove the seat to slide it on or off—and fits very close to the wheel to catch more mud. It also rolls up for easy storage and comes in a rainbow’s worth of colorways.

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Light & Motion Urban 800 Fast Charge

Appreciated by gear designers and nasty weather-bearers alike, the first fully waterproof bike light from Light & Modern offers a failsafe solution for fall. For evidence, the Fast Charge ($180) has been tested effective at depths of up to one meter, which is considerably wetter than what the average rider might expect to see on the commute home. The light is also durable, lightweight, sleek and attractive—and requires no tools to mount on either the handlebars or a helmet.

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Rapha Hardshell Jacket

Rapha is famous for designing some of the finest road cycling gear in the world, and their new hardshell jacket is certainly no exception. Sleek and colorful, with minimalist stripped-down lines, the jacket is simply well done. Plus, fully taped seams and a breathable laminate solve the road rider’s perpetual problem of how to let sweat escape while keeping the rain out.

Images courtesy of respective brands

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