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Bahdeebahdu

Repurposed and upcycled works of art confront throwaway culture

by Tisha Leung in Culture on 14 June 2010

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The Philadelphia-based multi-disciplinary gallery Bahdeebahdu looks to the natural elements of discarded objects to develop works of fine art, sculpture, furniture and one-off projects. Co-founded by interior designer RJ Thornburg, Bahdeebahdu's latest exhibition "Other Nature" included his own works alongside those of eight other like-minded artists.

While cleaning the area around his country house, Thornburg accumulated a pile of rusted and deteriorated metal debris he then crafted into displayed in Plexiglass giving ubiquitous household items a certain elegance ($1,200-$3,200). Robert Larson uses pieces of discarded Marlboro cigarette packs to cover canvases in a puzzle-like format ($385-$3,600). "Eyelids" by James Shuster uses bottle lids collected over several years to construct a mural ($3,000).

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Lauren Herzak-Bauman's "Fall" interprets her vision of everyday, disposable products made into porcelain slip sculptures ($400). Taxidermy mixes with jewelry in "Nascita Typica" by Beth Beverly, a registered taxidermist. The studio's intern, Ashley Wituschek, created "At a Standstill" using discarded pieces of metal to create new objects ($3,200). All sculptures sell through Bahdeebahdu.

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