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CULTURE
Lobo, 6 Questions
CULTURE
Lobo, 6 Questions
by Ami Kealoha
on 08 September 2005
lobo1.jpg

Since first watching Lobo's reel, I've played it probably 20 times - as much for the fluid motion of an unfurling pink hibiscus (for Diesel), or the geek appeal of a textbook-style diagram of a carbonated soda, as for the anthemic choice of soundtrack, Alice Cooper's "Drones." When I ask creative director Mateus de Paula Santos why he chose the music, he answers simply, "He's the king."

One of the premiere Brazilian design firms (they were one of the five chosen by Coca-Cola to create a music video and custom bottle as part of their M5 campaign), their commercials, videos, and cell animations are first-rate examples of motion graphics. Their work often features rough, unfinished lines and grid structures that lends an appealing rawness to slick computer generated imagery. In a 2004 abstract piece commissioned by Panasonic as one of 10 short films in their Capture the Motion spots for the Olympic games, lines and ink blots dance across the screen slipping from glowy star-like impressions to hand-rendered painterly shapes. The recent Toyota "Kluger" commercial which just started airing about two weeks ago in Australia shares a similar dramatic pallet and mixes organic elements with futuristic lines. Other work, like "Girl Power," a block created for the Anime Network in 2004, uses humor, like pink camouflage airplanes and tanks. A recent Toy Story-esque music video for The Flaming Lips' "You Gotta Hold On" made use of found objects to create a stop-motion animation piece that will be shown in the upcoming Resfest. (See production stills from "You Gotta Hold On," as well as stills from the finished video, images from the Capture the Motion piece, Girl Power, the Toyota spot, and Diesel Dreams, after the jump.)

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